Posts Tagged ‘TF’

Hurricane!!

Posted: September 16, 2010 by orlandoayli in general, Pupil
Tags: , ,

 Hurricanes are devastating storms with very strong winds that can blow up to 220 miles per hour. We measure hurricanes with the Saffir-Simpson scale. They start over an area of warm tropical sea like the Indian oceans, Atlantic and the Pacific. Hurricanes can destroy trees and buildings and even lift up boats and cars and throw them around.

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For details of the Saffir-Simpson Scale go to this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saffir%E2%80%93Simpson_Hurricane_Scale

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The Warsaw uprising

Posted: September 14, 2010 by dukefrederick in festivals and remembrance, general, Pupil, ROH, Schoolwork
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The Warsaw Uprising 1944 In August 1944, the people of Warsaw rose up against the Nazi occupation of their city. They expected the Soviet Red Army to support them but the women, children and young people of Warsaw, fighting with improvised and home-made weapons, were left stranded and vulnerable; with minimal help and supplies.

The Warsaw Uprising was a major World War ll operation by the Polish Resistance army and civilians to free Poland from Nazi oppressors. Throughout Poland, fighting broke out as the Polish Resistance army tried to free Poland. The rebellion ended with a retreat by Polish forces after 63 days of fighting.

The uprising began on the 1st August 1944 as part of a nationwide rebellion when the Red Army approached Warsaw. Their main objective was to free Poland from Germans.

Initially, the Polish army seized substantial areas of the city. Soviet forces did not advance beyond the city’s borders until mid September. In the city bitter fighting between the Polish and Germans continued. By the 16th September, the Red Army had reached a point only a few hundred metres from the Polish positions, but they did not make any further advances. This led to allegations that Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had wanted the uprising to fail so that the Soviet occupation of Poland would not be challenged. Despite the harsh conditions and the fighting, morale among the Polish community was high, and there are many photographs showing happy, smiling faces. The Poles knew they were unlikely to defeat the Nazis, but it was important show the rest of the world that they were ready to fight for their independence.

Winston Churchill pleaded with Joseph Stalin and Franklin D. Roosevelt to arrange aid drops but without success. Churchill then arranged 200 low-level supply drops with the British, South African and Polish air forces.

Although we do not know the exact number of casualties, it is estimated to be about 16,000 members of the Polish resistance army killed, and about 6,000 badly wounded; as well as between 150,000 and 200,000 civilians, most of whom were butchered by German troops. German casualties totalled about 2,000 soldiers killed, 7,000 missing and 9,000 wounded. During the fighting over 25% of the city’s buildings were destroyed, and following the Polish surrender, Germans destroyed 35% of the city block by block with all the fighting from 1939- 1944 over 85% of the city was destroyed After the Polish surrender, the Soviet army marched into Warsaw, and claimed that they had liberated the city. The Warsaw Uprising 1944 In August 1944, the people of Warsaw rose up against the Nazi occupation of their city. They expected the Soviet Red Army to support them but the women, children and young people of Warsaw, fighting with improvised and home-made weapons, were left stranded and vulnerable; with minimal help and supplies. The Warsaw Uprising was a major World War ll operation by the Polish Resistance army and civilians to free Poland from Nazi oppressors. Throughout Poland, fighting broke out as the Polish Resistance army tried to free Poland. The rebellion ended with a retreat by Polish forces after 63 days of fighting. The uprising began on the 1st August 1944 as part of a nationwide rebellion when the Red Army approached Warsaw. Their main objective was to free Poland from Germans. Initially, the Polish army seized substantial areas of the city. Soviet forces did not advance beyond the city’s borders until mid September. In the city bitter fighting between the Polish and Germans continued. By the 16th September, the Red Army had reached a point only a few hundred metres from the Polish positions, but they did not make any further advances. This led to allegations that Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had wanted the uprising to fail so that the Soviet occupation of Poland would not be challenged. Despite the harsh conditions and the fighting, morale among the Polish community was high, and there are many photographs showing happy, smiling faces. The Poles knew they were unlikely to defeat the Nazis, but it was important show the rest of the world that they were ready to fight for their independence. Winston Churchill pleaded with Joseph Stalin and Franklin D. Roosevelt to arrange aid drops but without success. Churchill then arranged 200 low-level supply drops with the British, South African and Polish air forces. Although we do not know the exact number of casualties, it is estimated to be about 16,000 members of the Polish resistance army killed, and about 6,000 badly wounded; as well as between 150,000 and 200,000 civilians, most of whom were butchered by German troops. German casualties totalled about 2,000 soldiers killed, 7,000 missing and 9,000 wounded. During the fighting over 25% of the city’s buildings were destroyed, and following the Polish surrender, Germans destroyed 35% of the city block by block with all the fighting from 1939- 1944 over 85% of the city was destroyed

 After the Polish surrender, the Soviet army marched into Warsaw, and claimed that they had liberated the city.