The Warsaw uprising

Posted: September 14, 2010 by dukefrederick in festivals and remembrance, general, Pupil, ROH, Schoolwork
Tags: , , , , ,

The Warsaw Uprising 1944 In August 1944, the people of Warsaw rose up against the Nazi occupation of their city. They expected the Soviet Red Army to support them but the women, children and young people of Warsaw, fighting with improvised and home-made weapons, were left stranded and vulnerable; with minimal help and supplies.

The Warsaw Uprising was a major World War ll operation by the Polish Resistance army and civilians to free Poland from Nazi oppressors. Throughout Poland, fighting broke out as the Polish Resistance army tried to free Poland. The rebellion ended with a retreat by Polish forces after 63 days of fighting.

The uprising began on the 1st August 1944 as part of a nationwide rebellion when the Red Army approached Warsaw. Their main objective was to free Poland from Germans.

Initially, the Polish army seized substantial areas of the city. Soviet forces did not advance beyond the city’s borders until mid September. In the city bitter fighting between the Polish and Germans continued. By the 16th September, the Red Army had reached a point only a few hundred metres from the Polish positions, but they did not make any further advances. This led to allegations that Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had wanted the uprising to fail so that the Soviet occupation of Poland would not be challenged. Despite the harsh conditions and the fighting, morale among the Polish community was high, and there are many photographs showing happy, smiling faces. The Poles knew they were unlikely to defeat the Nazis, but it was important show the rest of the world that they were ready to fight for their independence.

Winston Churchill pleaded with Joseph Stalin and Franklin D. Roosevelt to arrange aid drops but without success. Churchill then arranged 200 low-level supply drops with the British, South African and Polish air forces.

Although we do not know the exact number of casualties, it is estimated to be about 16,000 members of the Polish resistance army killed, and about 6,000 badly wounded; as well as between 150,000 and 200,000 civilians, most of whom were butchered by German troops. German casualties totalled about 2,000 soldiers killed, 7,000 missing and 9,000 wounded. During the fighting over 25% of the city’s buildings were destroyed, and following the Polish surrender, Germans destroyed 35% of the city block by block with all the fighting from 1939- 1944 over 85% of the city was destroyed After the Polish surrender, the Soviet army marched into Warsaw, and claimed that they had liberated the city. The Warsaw Uprising 1944 In August 1944, the people of Warsaw rose up against the Nazi occupation of their city. They expected the Soviet Red Army to support them but the women, children and young people of Warsaw, fighting with improvised and home-made weapons, were left stranded and vulnerable; with minimal help and supplies. The Warsaw Uprising was a major World War ll operation by the Polish Resistance army and civilians to free Poland from Nazi oppressors. Throughout Poland, fighting broke out as the Polish Resistance army tried to free Poland. The rebellion ended with a retreat by Polish forces after 63 days of fighting. The uprising began on the 1st August 1944 as part of a nationwide rebellion when the Red Army approached Warsaw. Their main objective was to free Poland from Germans. Initially, the Polish army seized substantial areas of the city. Soviet forces did not advance beyond the city’s borders until mid September. In the city bitter fighting between the Polish and Germans continued. By the 16th September, the Red Army had reached a point only a few hundred metres from the Polish positions, but they did not make any further advances. This led to allegations that Soviet leader Joseph Stalin had wanted the uprising to fail so that the Soviet occupation of Poland would not be challenged. Despite the harsh conditions and the fighting, morale among the Polish community was high, and there are many photographs showing happy, smiling faces. The Poles knew they were unlikely to defeat the Nazis, but it was important show the rest of the world that they were ready to fight for their independence. Winston Churchill pleaded with Joseph Stalin and Franklin D. Roosevelt to arrange aid drops but without success. Churchill then arranged 200 low-level supply drops with the British, South African and Polish air forces. Although we do not know the exact number of casualties, it is estimated to be about 16,000 members of the Polish resistance army killed, and about 6,000 badly wounded; as well as between 150,000 and 200,000 civilians, most of whom were butchered by German troops. German casualties totalled about 2,000 soldiers killed, 7,000 missing and 9,000 wounded. During the fighting over 25% of the city’s buildings were destroyed, and following the Polish surrender, Germans destroyed 35% of the city block by block with all the fighting from 1939- 1944 over 85% of the city was destroyed

 After the Polish surrender, the Soviet army marched into Warsaw, and claimed that they had liberated the city.

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Comments
  1. ROH says:

    I’m really glad whith the way it came out. But I would be really glad if anybody hade any comments on how it could be inproved

    • evelinasec says:

      You have worked really hard at this ROH and you’ve learned a lot; not least co-ordinating other people’s work to make a coherent whole.
      I am very impressed with the voice over and the way you worked so hard on the script. Well done.:)
      I would like to see you try this technique again very soon using different subject matter – maybe a poem that you like.

  2. Russ says:

    I enjoyed looking at this, ROH, and learned a lot from it too. There is a lot of text to read. I found your commentary and the film footage worked very well together – just enough information, and the moving pictures speaking for themselves. Well done, a good piece.

  3. MIL (visiting teacher) says:

    A superbly presented bit of history. I thoroughly enjoyed listening to some of the events which occured and the pictures chosen made the piece all the more powerful. Really well done!

  4. ROH says:

    Thank you all 🙂 the comments were loverly and constructive and im really glad that everyone liked it it did take a londg time. Was there anything that you might change or inprove?

  5. swallow56 says:

    Well researched. I’ll leave a longer comment later

  6. Aleunam says:

    A very informative piece of writing about the Warsaw Uprising of the Polish people in 1944. As far as the writing text goes, my recommendation would be to really focus on breaking up the text with paragraphs.

    I thought you read the summary statements very clearly and with good intonation. Well done.

    On another matter: I would be interested to hear how you gathered your evidence for the text and the you-tube clip.

    Did you amalgamate the photographic footage yourself from a variety of sources, or was the video /photographic montage in the youtube clip a single youtube clip that you found on the web?

    I ask, because not all of the photographs are not from the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 but are photo which the Nazis took of the Polish Jews they had forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto. Did you know that the Polish Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto organised their own uprising much earlier – namely in 1943? The Jews in the Ghettos were not all in favour of the uprising, but many of the younger Jewish men and women imprisioned in the Ghetto felt they had to rebel even if their chance of winning against the Nazi army was slim. Some of these images – especially the famous one of the young boy with his hands in the air, is thought to have been taken when the Nazi’s finally overwhelmed the Jewish fighters; Others were images taken by the Nazi’s as propaganda photos – they were planning to show them to Germans to show how ‘subhuman’ Jews were. In fact, the photos were not used for this in the end, because it was thought some Germans might feel sympathy for the plight of the Jews.

    Links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warsaw_Ghetto_Uprising

    The insurgency was launched against the Germans on January 18, 1943. The most significant portion of the rebellion took place from April 19 until May 16, 1943, and ended when the poorly armed and supplied resistance was crushed by the German troops under the direct command of Jürgen Stroop. It was the largest single revolt by the Jews during the Holocaust.[4]

  7. ROH says:

    Thank you for the comment that you made it was lovely to see that you took the time out to identify the points that needed work.
    In the original writing there are paragraphs but WordPress will not allow them but I will try to edit it again . The video was made entirely from images from Google which pupils from the class sourced. And the text was mainly from Wikipedia and Mirosawa. The images were then edited and arranged in an order that best fit the text. We were not sure of what pictures were from which point in time but we did try to find which ones were from the Warsaw ghetto and which ones were from the Warsaw uprising. I made the video using Photo story 3. We did look at a variety of YouTube clips but we only used them for inspiration.
    I did think that all the pictures were from the Warsaw uprising but we were unsure of a few of them. Thank you for all the information and links about the Warsaw ghetto I knew a little bit about it but not that much. It would be lovely if you did a guest post about the Warsaw ghetto.

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