Trooping the Colour

Posted: June 14, 2010 by orlandoayli in festivals and remembrance, general, news, Pupil, ROH
Tags: ,

Saturday saw the annual event of Trooping the Colour for the Queens official birthday. Thousands of well wishers gathered to whish the Queen a happy birthday the annual event started under cloudy skies but the sun eventually broke through.

The Queen took a royal salute as her family looked on. Her actual birthday is on 21st of April, when she turned 84, but her official birthday is always in June. The Queen first took the salute in 1951 when she stood for her sick father George VI, since then she has taken the salute every year. The only exception was in 1955 when the National Rail was on strike. The Trooping the Colour first started with Charles II in the 17th century. The colours of a regiment were used as a rallying point in battle and were trouped in front of the soldiers every day so that they Saturday saw the annual event of Trooping the Colour for the Queens official birthday. Thousands of well wishers gathered to whish the Queen a happy birthday the annual event started under cloudy skies but the sun eventually broke through. The Queen took a royal salute as her family looked on. Her actual birthday is on 21st of April, when she turned 84, but her official birthday is always in June. The Queen first took the salute in 1951 when she stood for her sick father George VI, since then she has taken the salute every year. The only exception was in 1955 when the National Rail was on strike. The Trooping the Colour first started with Charles II in the 17th century. The colours of a regiment were used as a rallying point in battle and were trouped in front of the soldiers every day so that they would recognise their own regiment in battle. In London, the foot guards used to do this as part of their daily mounting on horse guards. And the modern Trooping of the Colour still runs along the same lines. The first mention of the sovereign’s birthday being “kept” by the grenadier guards is in 1748, and again after George the III became king in 1760, it was ordered that parades should mark the King’s birthday. From the time of King George IV, with a few exceptions, it has been an annual event . would recognise their own regiment in battle. In London, the foot guards used to do this as part of their daily mounting on horse guards. And the modern Trooping of the Colour still runs along the same lines. The first mention of the sovereign’s birthday being “kept” by the grenadier guards is in 1748, and again after George the III became king in 1760, it was ordered that parades should mark the King’s birthday. From the time of King George IV, with a few exceptions, it has been an annual even

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Comments
  1. evelinasec says:

    Well done ROH.
    This is very clear and concise, with a nice amount of historical detail as well. 🙂

  2. ROH says:

    Thank you for the comment . One thing that I might change is I would put up some pictures and some more paragrarths .

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