Volcanic Eruption In Iceland

Posted: April 20, 2010 by rosalindayli in HBL, news, Pupil

The volcano in Southern Iceland which erupted on 21st March 2010 just after midnight is continuing to cause problems worldwide. The volcano which is named Eyjafallajoekull has grounded all flights across the world, and there are approximately 40,000 people stranded across the world. This is causing big economic problems for airlines, as well as people and traders. Airlines are losing at least £130m a day; traders from Kenya are throwing away millions of pounds of fruit and vegetables a day. They don’t know when the airlines will be up and running, but they are hoping it will be soon.  It’s too dangerous at the moment to fly because the ash is in the air and the air gets sucked through the aircraft’s jet engine and causes engine failure. The thing that makes volcanic plumes so dangerous is that they look extremely similar to regular clouds, visually and on radar screens. Even when ash isn’t visible to the human eye, it can still pose a threat to aircrafts, because of the chemicals floating within volcanic plumes.

By secondary journalist Hollie L.

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Comments
  1. orlandoayli says:

    very good and it tells u the ture about the ash and volcaico

  2. Aleunam says:

    Dear H,
    I thought your report on the volcanic eruption was very well researched and that you summarised the key facts very succintly. I was particularly interested to read about the fact that volcanic ash can look very similar to cloud cover and that radar screens can take ask to be cloud cover! That would help to explain why some observers are now wondering whether volcanic ash contributed to the Polish plane crash in Russia. I wonder?

  3. evelinasec says:

    Great work Hollie. 🙂
    It would be good if you added some visuals to this post.

  4. FredBobbyJim says:

    Yes the volcano was very bad it stranded a lot of people but I have no idea how to say its name.
    Well written

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